2003年12月04日

Anarchy, Efficiency and the Common Law -by David Friedman

I have argued that there is reason to expect  a system in which legal rules are generated by firms competing

in a private market  to produce efficient rules.

Richard Posner has argued that there is considerable empirical evidence to suggest that the actual rules of angloamerican common law are efficient.

This raises an obvious and interesting question: can the mechanisms I have been describing explain the observed efficiency of the common law?



I do not know the answer to that question.

Certainly some forms of competitive law have contributed to the creation and development of the common law.

The common law had its origin in the legal system of AngloSaxon England,

whose early form involved a large element of private enforcement and private arbitration.[23]



It evolved in an environment of multiple court systemschurch, royal, and localwhere

litigants had at least some control over where their disputes were resolved.

Some common law rules originated as private norms,

and I have argued that norms are produced on something like a competitive market.

Some rules may have been borrowed from the medieval Fair Courts, which had some of the characteristics of the system I have described.



It is thus possible that what Posner observes in present day common law is fossilized efficiency, produced

by institutions that no longer exist[24] and preserved by the conservative nature of the common law.

That conjecture is consistent with the observation that the efficiency of the common law seems to have decreased

over time, at least in this century, with the long retreat from freedom of contract providing the most striking example.



It is also consistent with Posner\'s claim that it is common law, not legislated law, which tends to be efficient.

But it would require a much more extensive knowledge of the history and content of the common law

than I have to say whether such a conjecture provides a plausible account of such efficiency as modern common law possesses.[25]



In any case, the principal purpose of this chapter is not to offer a solution to the puzzle of why the common law is efficient,

supposing that it is. My purpose is to show why the law generated by the institutions of private property anarchy

would tend to be efficient, and to explore some of the limitations of that tendency.

Although the arguments I offer do not imply anything like a perfectly efficient legal system, they may provide better reasons

to expect efficient law under anarchy than we have to expect efficient law under other forms of legal system, including the sort we now have.



David Friedman



==以下粗訳=======



私的なマーケットで法律事務所が競争をしているシステムを考えた場合、そこから生まれる法ルールは効率的なルールであると期待する理由があることを私は議論してきた。

リチャードポズナーは、英米法のコモンローが効率的であるとする経験的な証拠が数多くあることを議論してきている。

このことは、明瞭で興味深い問題を提起する。私が記述してきたそのメカニズムは、コモンローに見られる効率性を説明することが出きるのだろうかという問題である。



私はその問題に対する答えがわからない。

たしかに、競争的な法律のある種の形態は、コモンローの生成と発展に寄与してきた。

コモンローは英米の法システムにその起源を持っている。

その初期の形態は、私的な強制と私的な調停の多くの要素を含んでいた。

それは、マルチコートシステム(複数の裁判所が共存するシステム)−協会、王室、地方ーの中で発展してきたものであり、そこでは訴訟当事者は、少なくともいくらかの、紛争が解決されるところの調整力をもっていた。

コモンローのある種のものは私的規範に起源をもっている。そして、そのような規範は競争的なマーケットのようなものによって作り出されてきたことを私は議論してきた。

またある種のルールは、中世の公正な裁判からの借用であり、それは私が描いてきたようなシステムの性格を持っていた。



ポズナーが現在のコモンローにみるものは時代遅れになった効率性であり、今はもう存在しない体制によって作られたものであり、また、コモンローの保守的な性質によって維持されてきたものである。

このような仮説は、コモンローの効率性は時がたつにつれて低下してくるという観察結果ともよく一致する。少なくともこの一世紀においては、ずっと契約の自由を低めてきているために、非常にそのままずばりの例証となっているのである。



このことはまた、効率的な傾向があるのはコモンローであり、制定法ではないというポズナーの主張とも一致する。

しかし、それを証明するためには、コモンローの歴史とその内容に関するもっとはるかに広い知識が必要であろう。



いずれにせよ、この章の主要な目的は、なぜコモンローが効率的であるというパズルに対する解決を提供することではないが、コモンローが効率的であることを

想定している。私の目的は、私的所有的無政府の体制によって生まれた法が、効率的になる傾向があるということである。

また、 その傾向のいくつかの制限条件を探ることにある。

私の提供した議論は、完全な効率的な法システムを意味しないけれども、それらは無政府下の効率的な法律が他の法システム下での法(現在の我々がもつ法を含む)よりも、より効率的であるというより良い理由を提供しているかもしれない。
posted by libertarian at 19:25| Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | David Friedman | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする
この記事へのコメント
コメントを書く
お名前: [必須入力]

メールアドレス:

ホームページアドレス:

コメント: [必須入力]


この記事へのトラックバック