2003年12月05日

Efficiency, Justice and Liberty-By David Friedman

[http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Academic/Anarchy_and_Eff_Law/Anarchy_and_Eff_Law.html]

The attentive reader, and especially the attentive libertarian reader, will have noticed that I have said nothing about what the laws generated by the market will be, other than efficient. In particular, I have said nothing about whether those laws will be consistent with either justice or liberty. That omission was deliberate. My purpose here is to discuss what outcomes we can expect a competitive market for law to produce, not what outcomes we want it to produce. This is an essay in economics, not moral philosophy.



Whether these outcomes will be consistent with either justice or liberty depends on whether either justice or liberty is economically efficient. In the case of liberty, I think there is good reason to believe that, as a general rule, it is. A considerable part of libertarian writing, my own included,[21] as well as a good deal of economic theory from Adam Smith on, defends the thesis that, on the whole, leaving people free to run their own lives maximizes total human happinessfor which economic efficiency may be considered a rough proxy.[22]



Whether justice is efficient is a harder problem, and comes in two parts. The first is the question of whether the rules implied by justice are themselves efficient rules; to that I have no answer, since I have no theory of justice to offer other than that implied by individual liberty. The second is the relation between individuals\' beliefs about justice and their preferences for law.



Suppose that almost everyone in a society shares certain beliefs about justiceperhaps that the conviction of innocents is a very bad thing, to be avoided even at high cost, or that murderers should be executed, or that children should not be executed, even for murder. Those beliefs will affect but not determine what laws the people in that society demand. Justice is only one of the things people value; an individual might favor a legal rule he considers unjust if he thinks it benefits him. So we would expect the efficient set of legal rules generated by the market to represent some compromise between the legal rules that would be efficient absent specific beliefs about justice and the rules implied by those beliefs. To put it differently, beliefs about justice affect the value to individuals of being under particular legal rules, which affects what legal rules are efficient, which affects what legal rules the market will produce.



===以下粗訳============



注意深い読者、特に注意深いリバタリアンの読者なら、次ぎのことに気付いただろうと思う。

その市場から生まれた法が効率的であること以外には、どのような性質があるかについては私が何も述べていないことを。

特に、これらの法がJusticeやLibertyと矛盾しないものであるかどうかについては何も述べていないことを。

これらの省略は、意図的なものである。

私のここでの目的は競争的な市場がどのようなものを作り出すかを予想することにあり、どのようなものを作り出して欲しいかを議論することではないからである。

これは、経済学のエッセイであり、倫理哲学のそれではない。



これらの成果物がJusticeやLibertyと矛盾しないかどうかは、JusticeやLibertyが経済的に効率的であるかに依存している。

Libertyの場合であれば、一般則として、それが効率的であると信じる尤もな理由があると私は思う。

リバタリアンが書いたもののかなりの部分は、私自身のものを含めてだが、アダムスミス以来の経済理論同様、概して、人々を自由にすることが、人間の幸福を最大化するという仮定を支持するものである。

また人間の幸福において経済的な効率性がその大雑把な指標となるのである。



Justiceが効率的であるかどうかは、より難しい問題であるし、また2つの部分から問題である。

最初の問題はJusticeによって適用されたルールが、それ自体効率的なルールかという問題である。

これに対して私はなんの答えも持たない。というのも、Justiceの理論に対して個人的自由によるもの以外で提供するものを何も持っていないからだ。

2つ目の問題は、個人的なJusticeに対する信条と、法に対する好みの関係である。



社会の中の殆ど全ての人は、ある種の信条信念を共有していると想定してみよう。

多分、無垢なる確信は非常に悪いことであり多くのコストをかけても避けなければならないことだが、それは、犯罪者は罰せられる必要があるとか、子供は殺人を犯しても罰せられるべきではないとかいったものだろう。



こういった信条はその社会における人々が要求するものが何であるか、影響を与えることはできても決定することはないだろう。

Justiceは、人々が評価する多くのことのほんの一つにすぎず、ある人はそれが自分にとって利益となるのであるならUnjustなルールを好むかもしれない。

であるからして、我々は市場によって生まれた法ルールの効率的なセットが、彼らの特定のJusticeに対する信条を欠いた法ル―ルと そのJusticeの信条を含んだルールとの間でのなにがしかの妥協点を表すと考えている。



これを別の言い方に置きかえると、Justiceに対する信条は、特定の法ルールの下にある個人の価値に影響を与える。

それは、どんな法ルールが効率的であるかに影響する。それは、どんな法ルールを市場が作るかに影響する。
posted by libertarian at 10:36| Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | David Friedman | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする
この記事へのコメント
コメントを書く
お名前: [必須入力]

メールアドレス:

ホームページアドレス:

コメント: [必須入力]


この記事へのトラックバック